vote Imaginary Forces for the Quietus’ Cult Star Award on 6 Music

The fine and upstanding music producer and sound artist Anthoney J Hart has had his Imaginary Forces alias nominated for the “Quietus’ Cult Star Award On 6 Music”. He’s up against some other fine talent but for us at Darkfloor it’s the sound of Imaginary Forces that gets our vote.

You’ll need to use Facebook to vote your choice.

The Quietus’ Laurie Tuffre explains

BBC 6 Music are running their Blog Awards this Sunday and the Quietus is again in charge of the Tomorrow’s Cult Star Today category.

We’ve picked out a shortlist of artists who are currently operating beneath the radar but will soon be commanding a loyal following attending their sell-out gigs and trading their much sought-after early material – and we need you to pick out the best of the bunch.

The Blog Awards show airs this Sunday, February 24, from 6-8pm – tune in here – and in advance of that have a look over the list… pick out your favourite, then vote for them over at our Facebook page before this Friday, February 22, at 1pm:

VOTE HERE

Hart’s Imaginary Forces is up against the sounds of Hey Colossus, Frisk Frugt, Hexvessel, Karenn, Powell, Mykki Blanco, Black Pus, Fat White Family and Gnod.

Head over to the Quietus to hear something from each of those nominated. Meanwhile here’s a recent recording of Hart in action when he performed over in Vilnius a few weeks ago.

As is suggested by name, Anthoney J Hart’s music as Imaginary Forces deals in things that never quite seem to be there. Sounds bunch and destabilise around each other as their foundations sway; sudden bright glares of noise bring to mind ancient cine cameras rattling light onto bare walls. But rather than drift toward curdled ambience, Imaginary Forces music maintains a rock-solid dancefloor impetus. The tracks that make up his diverse output always have at their core a throb that resonates back to the jungle and ‘ardcore of the early 90s, the scene wherein Hart first had his head turned toward the dark stuff. Taking in the fractured pulses of more noise based acts such as Yellow Swans, and even evoking the more hushed, foreboding atmospheres of Coil or Popol Vuh. But at its own warped level, Imaginary Forces music is a dancefloor experience. The dancers harried and flailing, like some previously-thought-lost rave footage from Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo springing scratchily to life.